Why Men in Maternity Matter.

An important blog on gender in medicine

Nomadic GP

In Australia, as in many other parts of the world, male doctors are becoming a threatened species in the field of obstetrics and gynaecology. Women now make up the overwhelming majority of trainees – roughly 80% across the country – and the numbers are increasing.  Our very own RANZCOG president, Dr Steve Robson, is a great advocate for women in medicine, and proudly highlights this evolving gender imbalance in his tweets and photographs. It is fast becoming the new normal.

But, as a feminist, I have some concerns.

This issue has garnered a fair bit of discussion in the international media of late, with an article published in the LA times last week stirring up some heated discussion. A number of blog posts have followed (including this, from my personal hero, Dr Jen Gunter and this), plus hundreds of comments, and some pretty robust debate on social…

View original post 1,256 more words


Drug seeker basted me like a turkey

Primum non nocere, and that includes not prescribing drugs of addiction. It is hard to say no, but sometimes it is kindest.


Turkey, by Ben Sanders Illustration: Ben Sandars

This month I got done over by a drug seeker. Tattoo Man basted me like a Christmas turkey, peppered me with garnished praise and slow baked his way through my seasoned outer crust. Bugger.

Usually, when it comes to slamming the script pad shut, I’m all Fort Knox.

Reception deliberately sends all hopeful newcomers down dead-end street to my brick wall. Five minutes later they exit, loudly proclaiming to the waiting room that, in effect, my clinical decisions are being influenced by the rather unlikely combination of both my genitalia and distal GI tract.

Funnily enough, those occasions are relatively easy. My patients in the waiting room know me well enough to guess what might have happened. And everyone knows their role: the receptionists blame me, as instructed, and I blame our Practice Policy—the only thing I’ve ever written which remains unsigned.

“Sorry madam, I’d love to…

View original post 419 more words

About addictive painkillers and dirty backdoor deals

An important issue, as a GP I see many people using excessive OTC Codeine. Drugs of addiction have no place in the armament of treatments for benign condition.s Thank you Edwin Kruys

Doctor's bag

Dirty dealsIt is concerning that those who have been given responsibility to look after the health of Australians take decisions influenced bycommercial interests instead of sound evidence and common sense.

As I have said before we have an opiate problem in Australia and it is the responsibility of doctors, pharmacists, consumers and governments to solve it.

One of the opiates that are harmful is codeine. Codeine is closely related to morphine and can cause dependence, addiction, poisoning and, in high doses or in combination with other drugs, death. That’s why in many countries this painkiller, like other opiates, is only available via a doctor’s prescription.

The independent Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has decided to do the same in Australia after extensive consultations with stakeholders including doctors, pharmacy groups and state health departments.

From 1 February 2018, medicines containing codeine will no longer be available without prescription in pharmacies.There will still…

View original post 1,741 more words

Same-sex marriage and the role of the GP College

Doctor's bag

Same sex marriage

During my medical training in Amsterdam I witnessed many of the effects of the Dutch liberal policies such as the legalised practice of euthanasia and their model on cannabis. The Netherlands was also the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage over 15 years ago.

When it comes to same-sex marriage I support this. Not so much because of health reasons but simply because I believe it is fair.

I acknowledge that LGBTIQ communities (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Questioning) have had a lot to endure. I also respect that there will be people who disagree with me and may have other opinions.

In Australia we now have the odd situation of the voluntary Australian Marriage Law Postal Vote, where we are asked to vote on the question: Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry? 

The RACGP position

The postal vote has created healthy…

View original post 566 more words

Health of the Nation: good and bad news according to Australia’s GPs 

Doctor's bag

Health of the Nation RACGP

Australia’s GPs believe that mental health is the number one emerging health concern, often related to co-existing chronic health conditions – but more is needed to keep Australians well.

This is one of the conclusions presented in the benchmark report General Practice: Health of the Nation 2017 which gives a unique overview of the general practice sector.

The report is based on various sources, including research commissioned by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and the MABEL (Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life) Survey.

Some of the key messages from the report:

  1. Mental health is today’s biggest health problem and will continue to be an issue in the future
  2. The GP is the most accessible health professional and should be utilised to keep Australia well
  3. Patient out-of-pocket expenses in general practice are increasing and present a barrier to patients accessing the required care

The bad news


View original post 454 more words

New study shows high parental confidence in GPs, but researchers draw bizarre conclusions

Researchers draw their own conclusions – what was the agenda, what was the audience

Doctor's bag

High confidence in GPs

A new national study published in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health shows that around ninety percent of parents are mostly or completely confident in GPs to provide general care to their children.

This is of course good news.

The findings also show that 93% of the parents participating in the study reported that they would take their child to see a GP in the event of a minor illness, instead of visiting the emergency department – which is exactly what everyone wants.

Therefore I was surprised to read the conclusion from the authors, a group of mainly academic paediatric researchers, that “confidence with GPs is an issue for parents of many walks of life” which could potentially lead to “greater numbers of ED presentations for children with lower urgency conditions.”

Sorry? The results of the study clearly show that only 2% of parents were not very confident in…

View original post 525 more words